What IPAAFF Means to Me by Kathlyn Quan

“What film has changed your life?”
“Joy Luck Club. It was the first time I ever saw someone who looked like me and challenged her identity on TV. I’ve never had that feeling before.”

That was one of the questions I was asked during my interview at San Francisco’s Center for Asian American Media (CAAM). I went into the organization, only able to list exactly one film about Asian Americans. After my internship, I had a list about a page long.

Being able to work at CAAM allowed me to be inspired, encouraged, and excited about all types of Asian American films whether I related to them or not. Even growing up in a diverse area of California, I was simply never exposed to these kinds of films and festivities that centered around Asian American culture and identities. Being able to be a part of something bigger was what I spent so many years discovering and learning about for my last year at Ithaca College.

When I came back to school, I knew I wanted others to be part of this community too. I wanted my friends and everyone around to feel the excitement of history and academia, passion and community all thrown into a week’s worth of celebration. As progress has developed on Ithaca Pan Asian American Film Festival, I am constantly challenged, frustrated, humbled, and appreciative of everything and everyone around me.

I learn every day about how businesses and organizations work, why hard work is so important, and most importantly, what it means to collaborate and work as a team. Projects such as IPAAFF show the best and the worst in people; I certainly know it has done that to me, but honestly, I’ve learned so much from these experiences and my teams.

Working with them reminds me why these festivals are so important. They bring people together about subjects that affect everyone. The more conversations we involve ourselves in, the more aware we become of these problems that do not belong to any one group. They differ between people, but injustice and inequality exists everywhere. While IPAAFF cannot represent them all, it opens a safe space for people to discuss and learn about everyday problems, solutions, and misunderstandings. Through dialogue, we face them together and that makes all the difference.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s